Balast Water Treatment Systems Sales

More than 90 percent of global trade is transported by sea, and each year transfers of up to 12 billion tonnes of ballast water take place around the world because of this. Ballast water is used to maintain the stability and trim of vessels, and to ensure their structural integrity. It is typically pumped in as cargo is unloaded and discharged as cargo is being placed on board.

Ballast water that is taken on in one ecological zone and discharged into another can introduce invasive (i.e.: non-native) aquatic organisms that can have a big detrimental impact on the local biodiversity, economy and even the health of local communities.

Bio invasion is one of the four greatest threats facing the world’s oceans today, alongside land-based sources of marine pollution, the overexploitation of living marine resources and the physical alteration and destruction of marine habitats.

The proper treatment of ballast water, as required by the IMO and the relevant authorities in the USA, actively removes, kills or neutralises organisms prior to discharge. Ballast water treatment differs from the older conventional process of ballast water exchange, which involves completely flushing the ballast water tanks while underway.

IMO Regulation| D-2 Ballast Water Performance Standard

  • ▶ Over 50 ㎛ : Less than 10inds/㎥
  • ▶ 10-50 ㎛ : Less than 10inds/㎖
  • ▶ Bacteria
    > Escherichia Coli : Less than 250cfu/100㎖
    > Intestinal Enterococci : Less than 100cfu/100㎖
    > Vibrio Cholerea : Less than 1cfu/100㎖

UV Systems
Ultraviolet purification systems combine physical filtration and UV technology. In such a system, the ballast water flows through a chamber that is surrounded by UV lights. The UV radiation “sterilizes” the marine organisms. They become harmless and unable to reproduce.

1. Ships constructed on or after 8 September 2017 shall comply with the D-2 standard for ships delivery (Constructed = Keel Laid).
2. In the case where a previous IOPP renewal survey had been completed between 8 September 2014 and 7 September 2017, the ships shall comply with the D-2 standard by the first IOPP renewal survey after entry into the force of the Convention.
3. In the case where a previous IOPP renewal survey had been completed between 8 September 2012 and 7 September 2014, the ships shall comply with the D-2 standard by the second IOPP renewal survey after entry into the force of the Convention.
4. Ships not subject to the IOPP renewal survey (normally less than 400GT) shall comply with the D-2 standard by 8 September 2024.